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Zone Heating is an effective way to save money. Which room do you and your family spend most of your time during the winter season? Heating up that particular 'zone' of the home is a wise thing to do. Why should you spend money heating parts of your home with your furnace that are vacant? Some consider this a waste of money and energy since one or two rooms are generally used at once. Most families use a fraction of their home therefore they turn to sensible cost effective 'zone heating' which starts with a fireplace.


Heating your home with a fireplace is not efficient because is takes heat out of your house and sends it through the chimney. You can turn your fireplace into a furnace with a gas or a wood insert. These units will draw air from the outside and force the heat inside your home.


​​When a fireplace is not is use, the damper should be in the closed position. Since hot air rises, it naturally wants to escape through the chimney. Closing the damper seals off this avenue of escape. 


​Placed in front of the fireplace, these sorts of devices will limit the amount of warm room air that escapes the house when the fireplace is not is use.

Doors work particularly well when a fire is burning down for the night, but the damper has to remain open to allow the smoke to vent.

While the fireplace is in operation, glass doors should remain open, since most of the warmth produced by a fireplace is in the form of radiant heat. If closed, the glass will deflect radiant heat back into the fireplace and reduce the heat output to the room. A masonry or factory-built fireplaces should have closeable metal, ceramic or glass doors covering the entire opening of the firebox for safety.

(NOTE: Video correction -Gas logs are least efficient NOT direct vent.)

Heat Shields

How to save with Fireplace Inserts

Before burning firewood, be sure it is properly dried and seasoned," the EPA suggests. "Wet wood can create excessive smoke which is essentially wasted fuel."

If you're cutting firewood yourself, the EPA recommends following four simple steps to make sure your wood is dried properly:

Split: Split wood in a range of sizes to fit your stove, but do not cut pieces that are larger than 6 inches in diameter to ensure proper burning.
Stack: Stack wood split-side down and off the ground to allow air to circulate around the wood.
Cover: Cover the top of the stacked wood with a heavy-duty tarp to protect it from rain and snow.
Store: Store wood for a minimum of 6 months for softwoods and 12 months for hardwoods.
Properly dried wood should have a moisture reading of 20 percent or less, the EPA says.


When a fireplace is not is use, the damper should be in the closed position. Since hot air rises, it naturally wants to escape through the chimney. Closing the damper seals off this avenue of escape.


​Placed in front of the fireplace, these sorts of devices will limit the amount of warm room air that escapes the house when the fireplace is not is use.

Doors work particularly well when a fire is burning down for the night, but the damper has to remain open to allow the smoke to vent.
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Fireplace ambience is cherished in all family homes, why not put a fireplace in the rooms you most enjoy? The Fireside Shoppe has fireplaces for all spaces, even the most  limited spaces! 

​​When a fireplace is not is use, the damper should be in the closed position. Since hot air rises, it naturally wants to escape through the chimney. Closing the damper seals off this avenue of escape. *Always make sure there is nothing obstructing the chimney before starting a fire in your fireplace.



Damper Tips

Wood Burning Firewood Tips:

Zone Heating Information - Energy Efficiency  

​​Fireplace Inserts are metal boxes usually come with glass doors that fit inside the firebox. They use a heat exchange chamber with channels to allow room air to pass through and absorb heat. Fireplace inserts usually require a full stainless steel flue liner, rather than simply connecting to an existing flue. An insert can put out up to five times as much heat as an open fireplace.